Religions of the world – different branches of the same tree

I recently wrote an article about ISIS – being pushed back, sex slavery – and how they used the Quran to justify sex slavery and raping people who are not of their brand of religion (or even of their strain of their brand of religion).

It seems like such a coincidence then that I immediately run in to an article about a Christian couple in the United States of America that held a 13 year old girl for 5 years as their sex slave using the Bible as their justification.

Just how different are the Christians and the Muslims when the foundation of their religions – their core documents can easily be used to justify sex slavery and rape?

Yes, yes, yes, I know the old tired argument : “You can justify anything in the bible/quran/talmud/bhagava ghita/etc.

It is all a heaping pile of BS. You know I have learned a lot about project management and studying waterfall and agile methodologies. The core about these methods is communication. Clear communication.

In no way can it be said that any religious text is a clear communication. How can you base your life on documents that are not clear – that contradict themselves? Documents that do not even clearly state something like “Slavery is immoral”, “rape under any circumstances is harmful and should not be allowed”, “genocide is immoral under any circumstances”.

Just how good can you be following documents that are not good?

5 thoughts on “Religions of the world – different branches of the same tree

  1. Robert Paulson August 15, 2016 / 2:22 am

    Religion is for people who cannot, or refuse to think for themselves.

    It insidiously allows these ‘literalists’ to commit atrocities, and then pass of the blame to a imaginary authority.

    It is the ultimate cop-out. It actually promotes evil because it allows these sick people to bypass their moral responsibilities as human beings with reasoning skills.

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    • codopfreedom August 15, 2016 / 7:56 am

      I don’t think I am willing to make unilateral statements that religion is for people who cannot or refuse to think for themselves.
      There is a wide variety of types of people that believe – as well as a wide variety of people who don’t believe. Definitely, ‘literalists’, YEC, and certain other groups present a danger – to themselves and to everyone – in both terms of human rights as well as fatalities.
      Religious people throughout time have made significant contributions to science – and the smaller contributions to society, having families and promoting peace.
      It is a great split – how something that *can* inspire people to be great and moral people – is also the cause for a seemingly larger group or at least more active groups that cause harm, reduce the rights of people for arbitrary reasons or promote the idea that the end of the (human) world is near and do their best to bring that end about.

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      • Robert Paulson August 15, 2016 / 7:05 pm

        So you propose religion has zero effect on someone’s reasoning or logical thinking skills when millions have died over such nonsense.

        Thinking a knight in shining armor is going to come back and correct all the wrongs in the world is a recipe for apathy.

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      • codopfreedom August 15, 2016 / 11:28 pm

        I propose that a person’s religion actually has very little to do with their morality or planning for the future – unless they “devote” their lives to it and it is the only thing that is important to them.
        I knew a corworker that swore up and down that the end was near – that there were various signs, etc. I knew also that he was a relatively reasonable person. So, he posted something on Facebook and I called him out on it – I asked him if he is so sure that the end is near – cash out his 401(k) and his retirement funds, and stop planning for his kids to college. I forget his exact answer, but it amounted to, he believed, but if it didn’t happen he still had responsibilities that he needed to take care of..
        Also, I don’t know if you are a big fan of Twilight Zone, but there was an episode where an individual got mind reading abilities.He listened in to people’s thoughts and tried to apply that to an advantage in his life. Turned out people think one thing, say another, and actually do something different.
        I suspect that what people vocalize about religion may in fact be different than what they really think, and what they do may be more of conforming to their culture rather than for the purposes of religion.
        Now, I’m not going to say that there aren’t people out there that take religion far too seriously and impact the world negatively. There are far too many examples of this – I just don’t think it is reliable to say that all people that say the believe in religion or imbalanced, have difficulty reasoning or a threat to society in general.
        There are also many different brands of belief out there – and the idea of a knight in shining godly armor coming to save the day is incompatible with many of them. Some, are even offended that there might be any evidence (including the end of the world) that there is a god, because it is supposed to be taken in faith.

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  2. Robert Paulson August 16, 2016 / 12:35 am

    Sure plenty of people half-ass their religion.

    That is why some people don’t take it literally, but they still lack the reasoning skills required to do away with it entirely and therefore as you say, they just confirm to the culture. That is clear proof that they do not think for themselves.

    Both are kinds of people are bad, (literalists and half-assers) one is massively apathetic and the other completely deluded to the point where they harm others.

    There are millions upon millions of these people out there, which is why nothing ever really changes for the better. Being the fence does nobody any good except that particular person so they can keep passing off their moral responsibility onto others.

    And what is keeping these people on that fence is their erroneous belief system.

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